Crossing Lines- New Perspectives
by Visionary Artists Opens in Chelsea

One of the more unusual shows in Chelsea is a small, theme-based exhibition “Crossing Lines,” bringing together recent works by YunWoo Choi, Adel Gorgy, and Robert C. Morgan presented at the Able Fine Art NY gallery. Selected for their originality in crossing boundaries in photography, painting, and sculpture, these artists’ highly personal points of view challenge perception and push the parameters of how we experience art. Within the contained space that art naturally imposes, their work opens up limitless possibilities for interpretation allowing individual realities to go beyond any single definition of the perceived work.

Using an interdisciplinary approach, YunWoo Choi and Adel Gorgy produce optically engaging art that connects to the viewer on a deeper level. Choi, a student of theoretical physics and Far Eastern philosophies, questions the basis of reality and whether ephemeral or intangible matter occupies an invisible space responding with a series of dynamic three-dimensional wall installations. Gorgy’s abstract photographic paintings “Permutations” introduce a metallic silver medium process enhancing a multi-dimensional effect and plays up on the interaction between form and color. Taking a more cerebral approach is Robert Morgan who sees his art as a mental exercise not requiring a reliance on language, claiming the art is likely to exist, if at all, in space; a statement that circles back to principles of Conceptual art where the idea behind the work surpasses the work itself. Given their divergent artistic styles the numerous shared influences are markedly apparent.

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YunWoo Choi, Dimension Study in Blue

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YunWoo Choi, Dimension Study in Blue #10

Korean artist YunWoo Choi presents the largest grouping, a numbered series aptly titled “Dimension Study in Blue.” To achieve depth and contrast in the blues, Choi experiments with color mixing resin and paint. He backlights a painting on Plexiglas for color intensity and to suggest the universe’s hidden dimensions referred to as the fifth and sixth (Choi states there are 14) – where unseen worlds exist, or so the theory goes. Choi adds layers by folding recycled and reconfigured paper formed into a funnel then dipped in resin pulled to the fore setting up an entry point to another stratosphere coming as close as one can to landing elsewhere.

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Adel Gorgy, Permutation of Opposites…after Twombly

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Adel Gorgy, Permutation of a Moment Lost…after Matisse

Central to Adel Gorgy’s work is making art where the subject is the art and possibilities are limited only by the imagination. In “Permutations,” Gorgy fuses these ideas and executes them with a metallic silver medium; a complex method employing multi-layer and multi-pass print runs which heighten the element of depth. This technique is manifested in a three-dimensional work “After Matisse,” based on the artist’s popular cut-outs currently on view at MoMA and, in “After Opposites,” Cy Twombly’s graffiti art is reconfigured by juxtaposing different brushstrokes and intensifying the yellow and red color. The idea is similarly repeated in “After Warhol, a nod to the influence of Pop Art’s brilliant colors. While owing a debt to Abstract Expressionism and Conceptual art, Gorgy’s use of photography by taking numerous photographs and recomposing select stylistic elements of familiar works has redefined the art form and given his work a certain edge one the artist seems poised to develop.

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 Robert C. Morgan, A/V#30

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Robert C. Morgan, Wu Wei 3

Robert C. Morgan’s minimalist and conceptual paintings are meant to absorb and reflect light simultaneously challenging the notion in the current zeitgeist that paintings are static; although his most interesting work a vertical black/blue line centered against a pinkish background is imbued with an extraordinary stillness. The numbered circle compositions entitled “Wu Wei,” a Taoist concept meaning non-action, presents a set of circles either clustered or isolated that appear fixed in space yet give a feel of movement bringing into question “where does art reside?” Morgan is circumspect and rather tentative in providing an answer referring to his work’s “remarkable capacity to exist unnoticed,” or, “residing elsewhere in another stratosphere.” None of this came to mind in my viewing, but consider slowing down and taking time out to enjoy a more contemplative mood.

“Crossing Lines” runs through February 14, 2015, Able Fine Art NY, 511 West 25th Street, NYC, 212-675-3057, www.ablefineartny.com

CREDITS
YunWoo Choi
Dimension Study in Blue
Paper, Resin, Plexiglas, Light
2014

YunWoo Choi
Dimension Study in Blue #10
Paper, resin, Plexiglas, light
2014

Adel Gorgy
Permutation of Opposites … after Twombly
Pigment Ink on Metallic Silver Medium

Adel Gorgy
Permutation of a Moment Lost … after Matisse (and Opening Photo)
Pigment Ink on Metallic Silver Medium
2014

Robert C. Morgan
A/V#30
Acrylic on Canvas
2000

Robert C. Morgan
Wu Wei 3
Acrylic on Canvas
2014

About Tamara Moscowitz (37 Articles)
Tamara Moscowitz is a writer on art, design, and home décor for digital and print media. Starting out as a features writer for Florida Designers Review and Florida Design she transitioned to online magazines that include elledecor.com, designintell/vandm.com, and creativeabode.com. Currently, in addition to contributing articles to Woman Around Town she also writes for InteriorDesign.net. She was Founder and Managing Editor of “The Jewish Experience,” a magazine published under the auspices of the Center for Jewish History one of several undertakings as director of communications. As a book publicist she freelanced at Harcourt, among others, planning press and publicity activities for foreign authors. Her long association with PEN American Center, the international writers organization involved fundraising events and marketing literary forums.