Wear Your Values: The Passionate Protest Collection

Sandi Miller Burrows has been a precious jewelry designer in New York City for over 40 years, an activist and proponent of equality since the 1960s. Burrows was inspired to design this collection as a reaction to issues of today, to be provocative, create conversation, and promote unity.

The collection was born four months after “this person,” as Burrows calls Trump, became president. “I was bitching to my son constantly and he said, “Mommy just shut up or do something about it.” It kind of kicked me in the ass and I started designing what ended up being called My Passionate Protest Collection.

” T-Shirt that I silk screened in the Spring of 1970,when we all went on strike and shut all of
the colleges and universities around the country
protesting the war in Vietnam.” From Burrows’ studio.

“I’m an old hippie. This administration doesn’t work for me at all. I protested Vietnam, was a part of the sexual revolution, and that of women’s rights, gay rights, and civil rights. We’ve been fighting for equal rights forEVER! Equality is paramount! “

Burrows is ” angry, depressed, and discouraged that after nearly 50 years, this administration is taking us back before the Age of Aquarius when the only citizens that “counted” were straight, white men. Millennials and other young generations need to understand that this has been going on a very long time and a great deal is presently at risk of being lost.”

Examples below do not constitute the entire collection.

Feminism: “Smash the Patriarchy was the first one. It’s the same issues. We’re still fighting for equal pay and for control over our own bodies. There are more women in powerful jobs than there ever were, but we seem to have a long way to go. Even in the arts, women have to fight for their place in museums. The MeToo Movement –rights of women to be heard if they’ve been raped and not become the accused after the fact. Brett Kavanaugh and all that jazz.” Several of these designs display the word “SHERO”: a woman admired or idealized for her courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities; a heroine. Several boast the purple, green and white colors of Suffragettes.

Humanitarianism: “There’s the greed issue; the question of finding common ground- this is spreading all over Europe and South America. If you wanted to leave, where would you go? Canada may be the only place. Anti-Semitism and White Supremacy are both on the rise.  Immigration-separating parents from their children is beyond, beyond…” There are single word bar pins like Dignity, Equality, Power, Resist, Revolution…and one that says Morality, Integrity, Conscience.

Freedom: “Something we thought we had. The first one was Above All Vote. A classic triangle is meant to indicate seeing is believing– not the evil eye. Democracy and Freedom are very intertwined. And when you realize it’s the Electoral College that elects our president, then this really isn’t a democracy. That idea made sense at the beginning of the country when so few were educated, but now it should be eliminated. The freedom to vote is curbed by rampant gerrymandering and by the internet that disseminates lies.”

Environmentalism: “All the other categories and problems are determined by whether or not we can even live/survive here. To me this is the all consuming issue. What this administration has done to roll back protections…and it’s all about money. Thank God for governors like Evan Newsome who’s not gonna partake. These people have children and grandchildren, don’t they care about their futures?! I created The Earth’s Conscience, Nothing Matters More, and Harm Me Not”

Gender Equality: “There’s still LGBTQ discrimination. In fact, it’s increased since Trump took office. In my research I learned that homosexuals in concentration camps had to wear a downward-pointing pink triangle. Everybody should have the right to be who they are.” Everybody should have the right to be who they are.” Triangles were sewn onto the shirts of gay men—to identify and further dehumanize them. A Straight Allies configuration is also very important to defend and encourage.

Civil Rights/Birth Rights: Gerrymandering is a particular scourge in southern states with large black populations. African Americans came on the same first boats as white people but were down in the slave quarters. They’ve been here as long as everybody else, but are discriminated against and picked on. Take off the skin and we’re all the same, same contents. Religious prejudice might fit here as well.

Unique Pieces: Art Matters speaks for itself. (Under the thumb of this administration it’s starving and choking) The heart with thorns indicates difficulty in connecting, letting things in; the blindfolded American Eagle can’t look because things are just so horrible.

Medals: These are pieces combined by a client to express what he/she thinks/feels. Every one is custom.

“Men are still creating wars around the world. If you and I disagree about something when we sit down to talk about something, voices may be raised, but it would never occur to me to punch you! This is the 21st Century. We’re a little rock in the middle of the universe and if we don’t get a long we’re all gonna die.”

Formats: Small Pins 1 1/4″, Large Pins 2″, Bar Pins 1 1/2″ or 2″, Hearts 1 3/8,” Small Medals 1x 1 1/2″, Large Medals 2x 21/2″ Pendants, Key Chain/Handbag or Backpack  Charms.

Materials: Durable, bright, non-tarnishing, nontoxic bronze.
Prices range from $85.00 to $300.00
Order Time: A couple of days if in stock, 3-4 weeks if not.
Shop online here

About Alix Cohen (688 Articles)
Alix Cohen is the recipient of eight New York Press Club Awards for work published on this venue. Her writing history began with poetry, segued into lyrics and took a commercial detour while holding executive positions in product development, merchandising, and design. A cultural sponge, she now turns her diverse personal and professional background to authoring pieces about culture/the arts with particular interest in artists/performers and entrepreneurs. Theater, music, art/design are lifelong areas of study and passion. She is a voting member of Drama Desk and Drama League. Alix’s professional experience in women’s fashion fuels writing in that area. Besides Woman Around Town, the journalist writes for Cabaret Scenes, Broadway World, and Theater Pizzazz. Additional pieces have been published by The New York Post, The National Observer’s Playground Magazine, Pasadena Magazine, Times Square Chronicles, and ifashionnetwork. She lives in Manhattan. Of course.